Welcome to a new school year!

Tracy Chappell

Lesson Plans

September 6-16

Back to School Unit

Expectations:

*Introduction to Champs expectations

*Introduction to Kagan strategies

*Introduction to Classroom expectations

*Introduction is ISJ use and procedures

Monday: Labor Day Holiday

Tuesday: Half day for students. Students welcomed.  First day questions answered.  Preview of the year’s activities given. Classroom expectations introduced.  Summer vacation survey completed and shared as a class.

Wednesday: Warm-up. Video from neok12.com playing as students enter so we can discuss what science is for the warm up question: “What is science ?” I will review the RTP/RTC procedures. Expectations reviewed will be the attention signal, classroom procedures.  Students will explore different science tools and their uses.  Students will practice Kagan think, pair, share while covering questions about the students themselves.

Thursday: Warm-up.  Expectations over quality work and independent work reviewed.  Students will complete the district science common growth assessment.  Students will receive two grades for this assignment, one for the number correct which is not used for their semester grade and a second one for participation which is used as a grade.

Friday:  Warm-up which will include a John Collins, Type 1.  Expectations over group work reviewed and classroom procedures previously discussed reviewed again.  Students that didn’t finish the CGA will have an opportunity to complete it.  Other students will complete a reading assignment over growth vs. fixed mindset, fair vs equal.  Once finished they will complete a “Would you rather” graphing exercise in which they interview each other and graph the results.

Monday: Warm-up.  Monday warmups will be a reflective piece that students will complete to focus on good habits. Expectations over using materials and how we properly travel to and from the lab rooms practices (6th graders will also visit the RTC at this time.  Students will receive their ISJ’s The will have a chance to review past students’ ISJ’s.  They will write their names and information on the front, rules and number the pages. Students will be given their syllabus lab safety contract and hear lab safety presentation from myself.

Tuesday: Warm-up.  Students will review hallway expectations. Students will practice Kagan Hand up, to pick a partner. They will then complete an observation lab in which they will make observations on leaf samples and try to identify similar samples.  They will also practice correct sink usage, stool usage and clean up protocols.  Homework #1 will be a review over Champs expectations.

Wednesday:  Warm-up.  Students will review classroom work expectations.  As a class we will watch a lab safety video and discuss its importance.  Students will take lab safety quiz and tape safety contract and syllabus in the front of the interactive notebooks.  We will review lab safety.

6th graders will create a lab poster while 7th graders will create lab safety comic strips.

Thursday:  Warm-up.  Students will  begin work on their reference pages in their ISJ.  These will include lab safety contracts, expectations, grades reference sheets.  Students that finish may decorate their ISJ or complete their safety posters/comic strips.

Homework #2 will be over lab safety.

Friday:  Warm-up. We will review expectations of classroom movement and technology.   Students will have a list of expectations.  They will individually be in different spots.  They will complete the following in order: CGA, ISJ, safety work and finally a computer assignment  that reviews how to check grades, check staff blogs, and web quest on the scientific method using Compass Odyssey.  Students will have to take home safety assignment if it has not been finished.

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Announcement: Students will start the district reproductive health curriculum on Friday. Instead of referring the my blog refer to the district letter mailed for the lessons provided. Thank you.
Tracy Chappell

May 23rd Lesson Plans

Measurement Topic 2: Solar Energy/Water Cycle

Expectations:

E.ES.07.11:

Demonstrate, using a model or drawing, the relationship between the warming by the

sun of the Earth and the water cycle as it applies to the atmosphere (evaporation, water vapor, warm air rising, cooling, condensation, clouds).

E.ES.07.82:

Analyze the flow of water between the components of a watershed, including surface

features (lakes, streams, rivers, wetlands) and groundwater.

Atmosphere/Weather and Climate

Expectations:

E.ES.07.71:Compare and contrast the difference and relationship between climate and weather.

E.ES.07.72: Describe how different weather occurs due to the constant motion of the atmosphere from the energy of the sun reaching the surface of the Earth.

E.ES.07.73:Explain how the temperature of the oceans affects the different climates on Earth because water in the oceans holds a large amount of heat.

E.ES.07.74:Describe weather conditions associated with frontal boundaries (cold, warm, stationary,and occluded) and the movement of major air masses and the jet stream across North America using a weather map.

Monday

Warmup. Students will review the different fronts to investigate which ones produce different weather patterns. They will also review a weather map and practice reading the different symbols. Students will then make bingo cards to review for their district written Post Common Growth Assessment.

Tuesday

Warmup. Students will make study cards as they review the year’s units. Students will make bingo cards and then we will review the units playing bingo. I will call out definitions or concepts as students try to match with answer. Homework #5 assigned. .

Wednesday

Warmup. Students will complete District Common Growth Assessment. This is a written test.

Thursday

Warmup. Students will complete District Common Growth Assessment. Students that are finished will be allowed to make up any missing owrk. Homework #6 will be assigned. This homework can be done twice for extra credit.

Friday

Warmup. Students will begin District written reproductive health curriculum. We will discuss classroom norms and the persistence of myths in society. We will also discuss the use of the question box.

PLTW

6th Grade

Understandings

1.In the United States, we use both Standard and Metric systems of measurement.

2.Being able to measure accurately is important at school and at home, at work and when pursuing hobbies.

3.Precision measuring tools are needed for accuracy, but tools must be used correctly to ensure accurate measurements are taken.

4.Quality workmanship and accurate measurements with precise instruments are necessary to successfully solve problems.

Knowledge and Skills

It is expected that students will:

•Select the appropriate value from a conversion chart to convert between standard and metric units.

•Convert between standard and metric measurements including inches, feet, yards, millimeters, centimeters, and meters.

•Demonstrate the ability to measure accurately with different devices and scales using both the standard and metric systems.

•Explain how to measure in different contexts.

Essential Questions

1.Do you think the U.S. should convert to all metric measuring, or should the U.S. stay with using both the Standard and Metric systems? Why?

2.Why don’t we use such measurement forms as the hand span, cubit, and pace very often today?

3.Give two reasons why precision measuring tools are not always accurate.

Monday

Warmup.Introduction

North, east, south, and west. Go down the street about six blocks, take a left, and then go north for about 2 miles; you will see a building on your right. Take a right and proceed for another block. On your left, you will see my house.

Directions! Everywhere you go, you must follow directions in order to get from one point to another. This is especially true when you are in an area that is unfamiliar to you.The same is true when you want to place points on a grid for a computer drawing.

In order to give directions to a computer, a system is used that you may have also used in a mathematics class, the coordinate system. The coordinate system is a mapping of points on the X- and Y- axis. Most often, you see the coordinate system used in plotting points. When you connect the points, you may see a shape, such as a square, triangle, or circle.

These shapes are used with the coordinate system and enhanced with the addition of the Z-axis help designers to create complicated designs and objects. You will be able to create such designs once you learn about the coordinate system and how geometric shapes work together to create objects.

Equipment

•PLTW Gateway notebook

•Pencil

•Graph paper (optional)

•Ruler or dial caliper

•Straight edge

•Blocks

Procedure

Complete the following activities to learn more about the coordinate system and 3D drawing.

The Coordinate System

1.Label the X- and Y-axis and identify the positive and negative sections.

2.Label the Origin, where the X-axis intersects the Y-axis as Point (0, 0).

3.Starting with 1, number the intersection of the positive X-axis with the vertical lines.

4.Starting with -1, number the intersection of the negative X-axis with the vertical lines.

5.Starting with 1, number the intersection of the positive Y-axis with the horizontal lines.

6.Starting with -1, number the intersection of the negative Y-axis with the horizontal lines.

7.Plot and label the following points: A (3, 2); B (-2, 4); C (-2, -3); D (1, -2); E (2, 0); F (0, -3).

Coordinate Geometry

1.Label and number the X- and Y-axis.

2.Label the points at the corners of the square, triangle, and five-sided figure.

3.Label the center of the circle and one point at the outside edge of the circle.

Coordinate Geometry Continued

1.Mark, label, and number the X- and Y- axis.

2.Draw one of your initials in block letters on the grid.

3.Where each line intersects another line, label the points and fill in the chart for the initial. Start at one location and continue clockwise around the letter to represent connected lines.

Sketching and the X and Y axis Directions

1.Using the graph below, label the x- and y-axis. The large square represents 1 inch.

2.What does each small square represent? _____________________

3.Provide the decimal equivalent for each fraction below:

Fraction

Decimal Equivalent

1/8

1/4

3/8

1/2

5/8

3/4

7/8

8/8

4. Starting at the Origin (0, 0), sketch the profile (front) of the block provided to you by your teacher. Be sure to sketch lightly and with a pencil in order for you to adjust your sketch. Use the scale that each small square equals 1/8 in., each large square equals 1 in.

5. Label the coordinate points (X, Y) for each corner.

6. Show your finished sketch to your teacher.

Conclusion

1. What is the purpose of the coordinate system?

2. How does the Z- axis relate to the X- and Y-axis?

Tuesday-

Thursday

Warmup. Students will use the Tinkercad program to investigate.Procedure

In prior activities you learned about sketching. You were introduced to one- and two-point perspective as well as isometric and orthographic drawing. In a 2D drawing, you are concerned with only the two dimensions of width and length. In a 3D drawing, you are concerned with a third dimension, depth.

In this activity you will use a 3D computer modeling program specifically designed to help you craft 3D models of your drawings.

1.Complete the activity below while watching the Computer Modeling Fundamentals Presentation.

2.Use your 3D modeling software to complete the activities.

3.Make sure you get your teacher’s initials where necessary before continuing on in the activity.

1. Place

Shapes are basic building blocks of Tinkercad. A shape can add or remove material. Import your own, or work with existing shapes.

2. Adjust

Move, rotate and adjust shapes freely in space. Use tools like the ruler to input exact dimensions.

3. Combine

Group together a set of shapes to create models as detailed as you want.

Tuesday and Thursday homework will be assigned.

Friday

Warmup. Students will begin District written reproductive health curriculum. We will discuss classroom norms and the persistence of myths in society. We will also discuss the use of the question box.

Tracy Chappell
May 16th Lesson Plans
Measurement Topic 2: Solar Energy/Water Cycle
Expectations:
E.ES.07.11:
Demonstrate, using a model or drawing, the relationship between the warming by the
sun of the Earth and the water cycle as it applies to the atmosphere (evaporation, water vapor, warm air rising, cooling, condensation, clouds).
E.ES.07.82:
Analyze the flow of water between the components of a watershed, including surface
features (lakes, streams, rivers, wetlands) and groundwater.
Atmosphere/Weather and Climate
Expectations:
E.ES.07.71:Compare and contrast the difference and relationship between climate and weather.
E.ES.07.72: Describe how different weather occurs due to the constant motion of the atmosphere from the energy of the sun reaching the surface of the Earth.
E.ES.07.73:Explain how the temperature of the oceans affects the different climates on Earth because water in the oceans holds a large amount of heat.
E.ES.07.74:Describe weather conditions associated with frontal boundaries (cold, warm, stationary,and occluded) and the movement of major air masses and the jet stream across North America using a weather map.

Monday
Warmup. Students will use the chrome books to research different weather phenomena. They will write down the causes and effects of each one, their impacts and facts.
Tuesday
Warmup. 1st hour students will be taking the M-Step test so I will not instruct them. 5th hour students will review weather phenomena through video. They will write down notes on causes and effect, impacts and facts. Homework #3 assigned. 1st hour students will get it on Wednesday.
Wednesday
Warmup. Students will listen to a power point and then as a class discuss weather components. They will then take Lancer notes on weather from pages 36 to 43 from “The Air Around You.
Thursday
Warmup. As a class we will discuss how weather is associated with fronts and high- and low-pressure areas. This is important because air masses, pressure systems, and fronts cause weather to change. Homework #4 will be assigned.
Friday
Warmup. Students will have a substitute. They will be left a weather map to practice reading fronts and predicting weather.
PLTW
6th Grade
Understandings
In the United States, we use both Standard and Metric systems of measurement.
Being able to measure accurately is important at school and at home, at work and when pursuing hobbies.
Precision measuring tools are needed for accuracy, but tools must be used correctly to ensure accurate measurements are taken.
Quality workmanship and accurate measurements with precise instruments are necessary to successfully solve problems.
Knowledge and Skills
It is expected that students will:
Select the appropriate value from a conversion chart to convert between standard and metric units.
Convert between standard and metric measurements including inches, feet, yards, millimeters, centimeters, and meters.
Demonstrate the ability to measure accurately with different devices and scales using both the standard and metric systems.
Explain how to measure in different contexts.
Essential Questions
Do you think the U.S. should convert to all metric measuring, or should the U.S. stay with using both the Standard and Metric systems? Why?
Why don’t we use such measurement forms as the hand span, cubit, and pace very often today?
Give two reasons why precision measuring tools are not always accurate.

Monday
Warmup. Introduction
Throughout history many systems of measurement have been devised and then thrown out as more precise and more logical systems have come along. While most of the world has adopted the metric system, the United States still clings to the Standard system, also called the customary system. Which system are you more comfortable with? Why do you think that is true? In this measurement lab, you will have a chance to perfect your precision measuring skills in the system that you are less comfortable with. STEM professionals, such as scientists, technologists, mathematicians, and engineers, must be able to measure accurately. It is very important that you pay attention to the units that you are using.

Equipment
PLTW Gateway notebook
Pencil
Metric or English ruler
60# Cardstock,Tagboard, file folder, or cereal box
Glue
Tape
Paper fastener (optional)
Lg. rubber band (optional)

Procedure
In this activity you will create a skimmer that will slide across the floor with ease if your measurements are accurate and your workmanship is exceptional.
Neatly and accurately use the plan sheet and measuring tool to draw your skimmer main body, air scoop, and two (2) fins onto the material that you will use to make your skimmer.
Carefully cut out your skimmer parts. Cut only on the solid lines. The dotted lines are where you will score and fold.
Use your ruler to draw the dotted lines on your cardboard air scoop and main body, and then fold on these lines to create a 90° angle.
Glue the fins to the ½ in. flap on the main body. Make sure that the angled edge faces the front of your skimmer. Glue or tape the main body back to the fins at an angle as shown in the orthographic drawing.
Glue the flaps of the air scoop to the inside edges of the main body with the narrow end flush with the front of the main body as shown in the orthographic drawing.
After all glue has dried, throw your skimmer along the floor and see how smoothly it glides.
You may want to put a paper fastener behind the air scoop and use a rubber band to propel your skimmer across the floor.

Conclusion
1. How did completing the skimmer using the measuring system you are less comfortable with help to improve your skills?

2. How far did your skimmer travel?

3. Explain why your skimmer was more or less successful than your classmates.

Directions: Use the measurements from this sheet to lay out your skimmer on tagboard, a file folder, or a cereal box. The drawing below is not to scale. The solid lines are cutting lines; the dotted lines represent scoring and folding lines. Quality work and precise measurements will make your skimmer slide easily across a smooth floor.
The material that you use should fold easily and hold its shape. Decorate your air racer before assembling.
Metric Skimmer Plans (all measurements in millimeters) Skimmer Plans (all measurements in inches)
Tuesday-
Wednesday
Warmup. Introduction
An important skill that you should learn while taking Design and Modeling is the skill of sketching. This language is quick, easy, and “worth a thousand words.” I know some of you say, “My drawings look awful!” If you practice some of the techniques shown, you will be successful in quickly and effectively transferring your ideas to a sheet of paper for all to understand.
Thumbnail Sketch: This is a quick way to get an idea onto a sheet of paper. A sketch is usually small but drawn in proportion. The relationship of height to width should be shown in the thumbnail sketch. It is recommended that you use the pencil very lightly and darken when the drawing is in its final stage. A thumbnail sketch must be as detailed as necessary to convey your idea. You may use any view of the object that helps others identify and understand your ideas. Below you will learn about several different types of representations that may be helpful when using sketches to communicate.
Perspective Drawing: Perspective drawings are pictorial representations of objects because they look like a photograph. Perspective drawings appear as the eye sees the object. Geometrically, an ordinary photograph is a perspective. While perspective is of major importance to the architect, industrial designer, or illustrator, the engineer at one time or another is certain to be concerned with pictorial representations of objects.

One-point Perspective: In a one- point perspective, an object is situated with one face parallel to the plane of projection; only one vanishing point is required.

Two-point Perspective: In this type of perspective drawing, the object is situated at an angle with the picture plane but with vertical edges parallel to the picture plane. Two vanishing points are required due to the turning of the object from the picture plane; the result is a two- point perspective. This is the most common type of perspective drawing.
VP = Vanishing Point
Look at the photograph of the road and the illustration of the buildings that are shown above. Which of these photographs shows a one-point perspective? Which is an example of a two-point perspective? How can you tell? Hint: You can draw lines on the paper or hold a straight edge up to the image to help you identify the vanishing point(s). Label each photograph as One-Point Perspective or Two-Point Perspective.
Isometric Drawing: An isometric drawing is often used for quick sketching to explain an idea quickly. It does not show how we actually see an object. An object is drawn at an angle so that you can see three sides at once. Edges that are parallel on the object are drawn in parallel lines in an isometric view, with no vanishing points, so that lengths do not diminish in the distance. Lines representing horizontal edges are drawn 30° from a horizontal base line.

Orthographic Projection: An orthographic projection is the projection of a single two dimensional view (such as the front view) onto a drawing surface that represents the object when viewed through a line of sight that is perpendicular to the plane of the drawing.
A drawing which includes up to six orthographic projections is commonly referred to as a multi-view drawing.
A photograph or a perspective drawing shows an object as it appears to the observer, but not as it truly is. Such a picture cannot describe the object fully, no matter from which direction it is viewed. It is said that a perspective drawing doesn’t show TS&S (i.e., true size and shape). What is needed in industry is a complete and accurate description of the shape and size of an object that, in the end, will provide enough information that it can be made by the manufacturer. Most of the time, in order to provide information clearly and accurately, several views must be systematically arranged so that anyone can understand the true size and shape of the object.
You will learn to look at objects in Design and Modeling in a way that “normal humans” do not. When you look at an object from an angle as a human, you see three different dimensions (width, height, depth) all at once (like a perspective drawing). When viewing a multi-view drawing, you will look at the object in multiple ways. The front view shows two dimensions – height and width; the top view shows width and depth. The right side view shows height and depth. You must also keep in mind that this is a Universal Language. Therefore, the positioning of the views is standardized. Most often three orthographic projections are needed to fully describe the part. Usually the front view is placed in the lower left, the top view is placed directly above the front view, and the right side view is placed to the right of the front view.
Isometric Drawing: Orthographic Drawing:
On the isometric view shown above, draw arrows to identify the width, height and depth of the object and label each dimension.
Matching: Place the letter of the correct sketch in front of the term that describes that type of sketch or drawing.
Conclusion
1. Have you used any of these methods to sketch in other classes? If so, which ones and in which class?

2. Which method(s) do you think we will use the most in Design and Modeling?

Thursday
Warmup. © 2011 Project Lead The Way, Inc.PLTW Gateway – Design and Modeling Activity 1.4.4 Orthographic Projection – Page 3

Orthographic Projection Activity 2:
In this part of the activity, you will draw the same block four ways. In each drawing the block is turned to a different position.1. Use colored pencils to color the isometric view. Color the top of the block red, thefront of the block green, and the right side of the block blue.
2. In each position shown, draw the top, front, and right side views of the block,making sure that the front view is in the bottom left quadrant of the graph paper,the top view is directly above the front view, and the side view is directly to the right.
3. The dimensions of the block are given in Figure 1 and are to be used for all of the drawings of the block.
4. Each small square represents one inch.
5. Notice that the placement of the block in a drawing may fit in the drawing space better than in other views. You will also notice that each drawing may have a different number of hidden lines. Hidden lines are dashed lines used to represent an edge that cannot be seen from a particular view.

Friday
Warmup. Students will have a substitute. They will review a scientific article and answer questions over the article . Then students will share out their

Tracy Chappell

May 9th Lesson Plans

Measurement Topic 2: Solar Energy/Water Cycle

Expectations:

E.ES.07.11:

Demonstrate, using a model or drawing, the relationship between the warming by the

sun of the Earth and the water cycle as it applies to the atmosphere (evaporation, water vapor, warm air rising, cooling, condensation, clouds).

E.ES.07.81:

Explain the water cycle and describe how evaporation, transpiration, condensation,

cloud formation, precipitation, infiltration, surface runoff, ground water, and absorption occur within the cycle.

E.ES.07.82:

Analyze the flow of water between the components of a watershed, including surface

features (lakes, streams, rivers, wetlands) and groundwater.

Atmosphere/Weather and Climate

Expectations:

E.FE.07.12: Compare and contrast the composition of the atmosphere at different elevations.

E.ES.07.71:Compare and contrast the difference and relationship between climate and weather.

E.ES.07.72: Describe how different weather occurs due to the constant motion of the atmosphere from the energy of the sun reaching the surface of the Earth.

E.ES.07.73:Explain how the temperature of the oceans affects the different climates on Earth because water in the oceans holds a large amount of heat.

E.ES.07.74:Describe weather conditions associated with frontal boundaries (cold, warm, stationary,and occluded) and the movement of major air masses and the jet stream across North America using a weather map.

Monday

Warmup. Students will be introduced to temperature taking directions and repeat each day of the week as they gather data for weather research. Students will use the Glencoe book to cover the main ideas of climate change. They will complete Lancer notes in their ISJ expressing those main ideas.

Tuesday

Warmup. 1st hour students will be taking the M-Step test so I will not instruct them. Fifth hour students will be construction a 4 panel picture comparing and contrasting 4 different real climates. It will include information on temperature, precipitation, sunlight, vegetation, locations in the world, etc. No homework assigned due to testing.

Wednesday

Warmup. 1st hour students will be taking the M-step test so I will not instruct them. Students will complete their 4 panel picture work from Tuesday. Students that are missing work will have the option of completing a second picture of partial credit on missing work. Students will view Human Planet while completing work.

Thursday

Warmup. Students Students learn the differences between weather and climate. They collect local weather data for a defined period of time, and then compare these data with longer-term climate data for their community. Homework #2 will be assigned.

Friday

Warmup. Students will use the ScienceSaurus books to research 10 vocabulary words including definitions, pictures and examples. These terms will all be weather related.

PLTW

6th Grade

Understandings

1.In the United States, we use both Standard and Metric systems of measurement.

2.Being able to measure accurately is important at school and at home, at work and when pursuing hobbies.

3.Precision measuring tools are needed for accuracy, but tools must be used correctly to ensure accurate measurements are taken.

4.Quality workmanship and accurate measurements with precise instruments are necessary to successfully solve problems.

Knowledge and Skills

It is expected that students will:

•Select the appropriate value from a conversion chart to convert between standard and metric units.

•Convert between standard and metric measurements including inches, feet, yards, millimeters, centimeters, and meters.

•Demonstrate the ability to measure accurately with different devices and scales using both the standard and metric systems.

•Explain how to measure in different contexts.

Essential Questions

1.Do you think the U.S. should convert to all metric measuring, or should the U.S. stay with using both the Standard and Metric systems? Why?

2.Why don’t we use such measurement forms as the hand span, cubit, and pace very often today?

3.Give two reasons why precision measuring tools are not always accurate.

Monday-

Wednesday

Warmup. Introduction

Throughout history many systems of measurement have been devised and then thrown out as more precise and more logical systems have come along. While most of the world has adopted the metric system, the United States still clings to the Standard system, also called the customary system. Which system are you more comfortable with? Why do you think that is true? In this measurement lab, you will have a chance to perfect your precision measuring skills in the system that you are less comfortable with. STEM professionals, such as scientists, technologists, mathematicians, and engineers, must be able to measure accurately. It is very important that you pay attention to the units that you are using.

Equipment

•PLTW Gateway notebook

•Pencil

•Metric or English ruler

•60# Cardstock,Tagboard, file folder, or cereal box

•Glue

•Tape

•Paper fastener (optional)

•Lg. rubber band (optional)

Procedure
In this activity you will create a skimmer that will slide across the floor with ease if your measurements are accurate and your workmanship is exceptional.

1.Neatly and accurately use the plan sheet and measuring tool to draw your skimmer main body, air scoop, and two (2) fins onto the material that you will use to make your skimmer.

2.Carefully cut out your skimmer parts. Cut only on the solid lines. The dotted lines are where you will score and fold.

3.Use your ruler to draw the dotted lines on your cardboard air scoop and main body, and then fold on these lines to create a 90° angle.

4.Glue the fins to the ½ in. flap on the main body. Make sure that the angled edge faces the front of your skimmer. Glue or tape the main body back to the fins at an angle as shown in the orthographic drawing.

5.Glue the flaps of the air scoop to the inside edges of the main body with the narrow end flush with the front of the main body as shown in the orthographic drawing.

6.After all glue has dried, throw your skimmer along the floor and see how smoothly it glides.

7.You may want to put a paper fastener behind the air scoop and use a rubber band to propel your skimmer across the floor.

Conclusion

1. How did completing the skimmer using the measuring system you are less comfortable with help to improve your skills?

2. How far did your skimmer travel?

3. Explain why your skimmer was more or less successful than your classmates.

Directions: Use the measurements from this sheet to lay out your skimmer on tagboard, a file folder, or a cereal box. The drawing below is not to scale. The solid lines are cutting lines; the dotted lines represent scoring and folding lines. Quality work and precise measurements will make your skimmer slide easily across a smooth floor.

The material that you use should fold easily and hold its shape. Decorate your air racer before assembling.

Metric Skimmer Plans (all measurements in millimeters) Skimmer Plans (all measurements in inches)

Tuesday

Warmup. Homework not assigned because of M-Step testing schedule.

Wednesday

Warmup.

Thursday

Warmup. Students will have the opportunity to “race” their skimmers and record their data. They will write a reflection upon their skimmer experience. Homework #2 will be assigned.

Friday

Warmup. Introduction

An important skill that you should learn while taking Design and Modeling is the skill of sketching. This language is quick, easy, and “worth a thousand words.” I know some of you say, “My drawings look awful!” If you practice some of the techniques shown, you will be successful in quickly and effectively transferring your ideas to a sheet of paper for all to understand.

Thumbnail Sketch: This is a quick way to get an idea onto a sheet of paper. A sketch is usually small but drawn in proportion. The relationship of height to width should be shown in the thumbnail sketch. It is recommended that you use the pencil very lightly and darken when the drawing is in its final stage. A thumbnail sketch must be as detailed as necessary to convey your idea. You may use any view of the object that helps others identify and understand your ideas. Below you will learn about several different types of representations that may be helpful when using sketches to communicate.

Perspective Drawing: Perspective drawings are pictorial representations of objects because they look like a photograph. Perspective drawings appear as the eye sees the object. Geometrically, an ordinary photograph is a perspective. While perspective is of major importance to the architect, industrial designer, or illustrator, the engineer at one time or another is certain to be concerned with pictorial representations of objects.

One-point Perspective: In a one- point perspective, an object is situated with one face parallel to the plane of projection; only one vanishing point is required.

Two-point Perspective: In this type of perspective drawing, the object is situated at an angle with the picture plane but with vertical edges parallel to the picture plane. Two vanishing points are required due to the turning of the object from the picture plane; the result is a two- point perspective. This is the most common type of perspective drawing.

VP = Vanishing Point

Look at the photograph of the road and the illustration of the buildings that are shown above. Which of these photographs shows a one-point perspective? Which is an example of a two-point perspective? How can you tell? Hint: You can draw lines on the paper or hold a straight edge up to the image to help you identify the vanishing point(s). Label each photograph as One-Point Perspective or Two-Point Perspective.

Isometric Drawing: An isometric drawing is often used for quick sketching to explain an idea quickly. It does not show how we actually see an object. An object is drawn at an angle so that you can see three sides at once. Edges that are parallel on the object are drawn in parallel lines in an isometric view, with no vanishing points, so that lengths do not diminish in the distance. Lines representing horizontal edges are drawn 30° from a horizontal base line.

Orthographic Projection: An orthographic projection is the projection of a single two dimensional view (such as the front view) onto a drawing surface that represents the object when viewed through a line of sight that is perpendicular to the plane of the drawing.

A drawing which includes up to six orthographic projections is commonly referred to as a multi-view drawing.

A photograph or a perspective drawing shows an object as it appears to the observer, but not as it truly is. Such a picture cannot describe the object fully, no matter from which direction it is viewed. It is said that a perspective drawing doesn’t show TS&S (i.e., true size and shape). What is needed in industry is a complete and accurate description of the shape and size of an object that, in the end, will provide enough information that it can be made by the manufacturer. Most of the time, in order to provide information clearly and accurately, several views must be systematically arranged so that anyone can understand the true size and shape of the object.

You will learn to look at objects in Design and Modeling in a way that “normal humans” do not. When you look at an object from an angle as a human, you see three different dimensions (width, height, depth) all at once (like a perspective drawing). When viewing a multi-view drawing, you will look at the object in multiple ways. The front view shows two dimensions – height and width; the top view shows width and depth. The right side view shows height and depth. You must also keep in mind that this is a Universal Language. Therefore, the positioning of the views is standardized. Most often three orthographic projections are needed to fully describe the part. Usually the front view is placed in the lower left, the top view is placed directly above the front view, and the right side view is placed to the right of the front view.

Isometric Drawing: Orthographic Drawing:

On the isometric view shown above, draw arrows to identify the width, height and depth of the object and label each dimension.

Matching: Place the letter of the correct sketch in front of the term that describes that type of sketch or drawing.

Conclusion

1. Have you used any of these methods to sketch in other classes? If so, which ones and in which class?

2. Which method(s) do you think we will use the most in Design and Modeling?

May 2nd Lesson Plans

Just a reminder that conferences are this Thursday!!!!

Tracy Chappell

May 2nd Lesson Plans

Measurement Topic 2: Solar Energy/Water Cycle

Expectations:
P.EN.07.61:
Identify that nuclear reactions take place in the sun, producing heat and light.
P.EN.07.62:
Explain how only a tiny fraction of light energy from the sun is transformed to heat
energy on Earth.
E.ES.07.11:
Demonstrate, using a model or drawing, the relationship between the warming by the
sun of the Earth and the water cycle as it applies to the atmosphere (evaporation, water vapor, warm air rising, cooling, condensation, clouds).
E.ES.07.81:
Explain the water cycle and describe how evaporation, transpiration, condensation,
cloud formation, precipitation, infiltration, surface runoff, ground water, and absorption occur within the cycle.
E.ES.07.82:
Analyze the flow of water between the components of a watershed, including surface
features (lakes, streams, rivers, wetlands) and groundwater.
Atmosphere/Weather and Climate
Expectations:
E.ES.07.12:Describe the relationship between the warming of the atmosphere of the Earth by the sun and convection within the atmosphere and oceans.
E.FE.07.11: Describe the atmosphere as a mixture of gases
E.FE.07.12: Compare and contrast the composition of the atmosphere at different elevations.
E.ES.07.71:Compare and contrast the difference and relationship between climate and weather.
E.ES.07.72: Describe how different weather occurs due to the constant motion of the atmosphere from the energy of the sun reaching the surface of the Earth.
E.ES.07.73:Explain how the temperature of the oceans affects the different climates on Earth because water in the oceans holds a large amount of heat.
E.ES.07.74:Describe weather conditions associated with frontal boundaries (cold, warm, stationary,and occluded) and the movement of major air masses and the jet stream across North America using a weather map.

Monday
Warmup. Students will view GoPro: Red Bull Stratos – The Full Story for their warm up. As a class we will discuss what students remember about the gases in the atmosphere. Students will complete a definition drawing with graph of the atmosphere from Sciencesaurus book.

Tuesday
Warmup. Students will discuss how the layers of the atmosphere are defined. They will then read from The Air Around You and answer questions. Students will then graph pressure vs. altitude and temperature vs. altitude in their ISJ. Homework #1 will be assigned and due Friday since Thursday is a half day.

Wednesday
Warmup. Students will go to the dry lab and create balloon representations of the layers of the atmosphere. They will write keys that correlate with the balloon representations.

Thursday
Warmup. Half day. No homework assigned. Students will begin their research on two cities of their choice. They will be gathering facts about weather, climate, and water usage to create a children’s book comparing the cities.

Friday
Warmup. Students will begin their research on two cities of their choice. They will be gathering facts about weather, climate, and water usage to create a children’s book comparing the cities.

PLTW
6th Grade
Understandings
In the United States, we use both Standard and Metric systems of measurement.
Being able to measure accurately is important at school and at home, at work and when pursuing hobbies.
Precision measuring tools are needed for accuracy, but tools must be used correctly to ensure accurate measurements are taken.
Quality workmanship and accurate measurements with precise instruments are necessary to successfully solve problems.
Knowledge and Skills
It is expected that students will:
Select the appropriate value from a conversion chart to convert between standard and metric units.
Convert between standard and metric measurements including inches, feet, yards, millimeters, centimeters, and meters.
Demonstrate the ability to measure accurately with different devices and scales using both the standard and metric systems.
Explain how to measure in different contexts.
Essential Questions
Do you think the U.S. should convert to all metric measuring, or should the U.S. stay with using both the Standard and Metric systems? Why?
Why don’t we use such measurement forms as the hand span, cubit, and pace very often today?
Give two reasons why precision measuring tools are not always accurate.

Monday
Warmup. Students will take notes over PLTW 1.3.1 and then will complete several measurement exercises to practice their skills. A focus on the differences between measuring with the standard system vs the metric.

Tuesday
Warmup. Students will choose a zoo animal to make a habitat for in which they have to represent in paper. They will be given the option of different colors to represent vegetation, water, caves, mountains, etc. Students that finish early will have practice sheets to work with in groups. Homework will be assigned, but due Friday instead of Thursday since it is a half day.

Wednesday
Warmup. Procedure
In this activity you will learn about precision measuring and how to use a dial caliper to measure thickness, diameter, and depth.
View the PowerPoint and record notes according to the guide below.
Complete the Conclusion questions.
Guided Notes for Precision Measurement
Students will go to the dry lab to practice with digital calipers. prachttps://pltw.instructure.com/courses/305030/files/72608010/download?wrap=1

Thursday
Warmup. Half day. For additional practice with English measurement, students may play the ruler game: http://www.rickyspears.com/rulergame/
No homework assigned.

Friday
Warmup. Students will research air skimmers by using the Chrome books to view PLTW projects around the nation. Students will take notes over directions, design and decoration.

April 25 Lesson Plans

Announcements: There will be no homework this week due to M-Step testing. Some students will have different schedules this week.

Tracy Chappell

April 25 Lesson Plans

Measurement Topic 2: Solar Energy/Water Cycle

Expectations:

P.EN.07.61:

Identify that nuclear reactions take place in the sun, producing heat and light.

P.EN.07.62:

Explain how only a tiny fraction of light energy from the sun is transformed to heat

energy on Earth.

E.ES.07.11:

Demonstrate, using a model or drawing, the relationship between the warming by the

sun of the Earth and the water cycle as it applies to the atmosphere (evaporation, water vapor, warm air rising, cooling, condensation, clouds).

E.ES.07.81:

Explain the water cycle and describe how evaporation, transpiration, condensation,

cloud formation, precipitation, infiltration, surface runoff, ground water, and absorption occur within the cycle.

E.ES.07.82:

Analyze the flow of water between the components of a watershed, including surface

features (lakes, streams, rivers, wetlands) and groundwater.

Atmosphere/Weather and Climate

Expectations:

E.ES.07.12:Describe the relationship between the warming of the atmosphere of the Earth by the sun and convection within the atmosphere and oceans.

E.FE.07.11: Describe the atmosphere as a mixture of gases

E.FE.07.12: Compare and contrast the composition of the atmosphere at different elevations.

E.ES.07.71:Compare and contrast the difference and relationship between climate and weather.

E.ES.07.72: Describe how different weather occurs due to the constant motion of the atmosphere from the energy of the sun reaching the surface of the Earth.

E.ES.07.73:Explain how the temperature of the oceans affects the different climates on Earth because water in the oceans holds a large amount of heat.

E.ES.07.74:Describe weather conditions associated with frontal boundaries (cold, warm, stationary,and occluded) and the movement of major air masses and the jet stream across North America using a weather map.

Monday

Warmup. Students will take notes over groundwater movement. Students will have time to complete their water cycle poster. Students will complete a worksheet that asks them to practice writing water cycle terms and they will use their water cycle picture to answer cause and effect questions.

Tuesday

Warmup. Students will read the The USGS Water Science School information on groundwater. They will then take a true false quiz and as a class discuss the answers.

Wednesday

Warmup. Students will read the The USGS Water Science School information on lakes and reservoirs. They will answer questions from the article and from the data chart based on Land area and water area of each state.

Thursday

Warmup. Students will review water usage in the United States. They will then graph the results and make conclusions based on the results.

Friday

Warmup. Half day. Students will play place value yahtzee.

PLTW

6th Grade

Understandings

1.In the United States, we use both Standard and Metric systems of measurement.

2.Being able to measure accurately is important at school and at home, at work and when pursuing hobbies.

3.Precision measuring tools are needed for accuracy, but tools must be used correctly to ensure accurate measurements are taken.

4.Quality workmanship and accurate measurements with precise instruments are necessary to successfully solve problems.

Knowledge and Skills

It is expected that students will:

•Select the appropriate value from a conversion chart to convert between standard and metric units.

•Convert between standard and metric measurements including inches, feet, yards, millimeters, centimeters, and meters.

•Demonstrate the ability to measure accurately with different devices and scales using both the standard and metric systems.

•Explain how to measure in different contexts.

Essential Questions

1.Do you think the U.S. should convert to all metric measuring, or should the U.S. stay with using both the Standard and Metric systems? Why?

2.Why don’t we use such measurement forms as the hand span, cubit, and pace very often today?

3.Give two reasons why precision measuring tools are not always accurate.

Monday

Warmup. Students will have an opportunity to finish their furniture project. Students that are finished will begin measurement assignment 1.3.1 PLTW.

Tuesday

Warmup. Students will have an opportunity to complete their measurement assignment. They will also have worksheets to practice length measurement with a substitute for M-Step testing. Students that have been testing will watch https://youtu.be/g81opjVDAaA

Wednesday

Warmup. Students will have an opportunity to complete their measurement assignment. They will also have worksheets to practice length measurement with a substitute for M-Step testing.

Thursday

Warmup. Students will complete PLTW assignment 1.3.2. In this activity you will have a chance to practice your Metric and English measuring skills.

1.Complete the English and Metric measurement questions in this activity.

2.Complete the “Educated Guess” columns of the chart.

3.Obtain several measuring devices from your instructor and complete the actual measurement section of the chart.

4.Complete the conclusion questions and turn in to your instructor for grading.

Friday

Warmup. Half-Day. Students will play place value yahtzee.

April 18 Lesson Plans

Tracy Chappell
April 18 Lesson Plans
Measurement Topic 2: Solar Energy/Water Cycle
Expectations:
P.EN.07.61:
Identify that nuclear reactions take place in the sun, producing heat and light.
P.EN.07.62:
Explain how only a tiny fraction of light energy from the sun is transformed to heat energy on Earth.
E.ES.07.11:Demonstrate, using a model or drawing, the relationship between the warming by the sun of the Earth and the water cycle as it applies to the atmosphere (evaporation, water vapor, warm air rising, cooling, condensation, clouds).
E.ES.07.81:
Explain the water cycle and describe how evaporation, transpiration, condensation,cloud formation, precipitation, infiltration, surface runoff, ground water, and absorption occur within the cycle.
E.ES.07.82:
Analyze the flow of water between the components of a watershed, including surface features (lakes, streams, rivers, wetlands) and groundwater.
Atmosphere/Weather and Climate
Expectations:
E.ES.07.12:Describe the relationship between the warming of the atmosphere of the Earth by the sun and convection within the atmosphere and oceans.

E.FE.07.11: Describe the atmosphere as a mixture of gases

E.FE.07.12: Compare and contrast the composition of the atmosphere at different elevations.

E.ES.07.71:Compare and contrast the difference and relationship between climate and weather.

E.ES.07.72: Describe how different weather occurs due to the constant motion of the atmosphere from the energy of the sun reaching the surface of the Earth.

E.ES.07.73:Explain how the temperature of the oceans affects the different climates on Earth because water in the oceans holds a large amount of heat.

E.ES.07.74:Describe weather conditions associated with frontal boundaries (cold, warm, stationary,and occluded) and the movement of major air masses and the jet stream across North America using a weather map.

Monday
Warmup. Students will use neok12.com to explore water cycle terms. Students that finish will research two cities of their choice. One city will have a population more than 50,000 and one with less than 50,000. They will record population, rainfall, weather patterns.

Tuesday

Warmup. Students will complete vocabulary cards in their ISJ’s over water cycle words including: precipitation, groundwater, infiltration, transpiration, condensation, evaporation, water cycle. They will write a definition for each word and then their choice of their own sentence, examples, drawing. Homework will be assigned.

Wednesday
Warmup. Students will take notes over the water cycle, closed system, and how cycles work. They will look at different scenarios to explore cause and effect. They will also look at the next day’s lab to familiarize themselves

Thursday
Warmup. Students will create their own water cycle in a 2L bottle. The top will be cut off and inverted. Blue salt water will be put in the bottom. A cup will be suspended from the top to capture any condensed water that has evaporated. Homework will be assigned.
Friday

Warmup. Students will research ways to decrease water usage for Earth Day. They will also look at ways that other countries clean and control their water usage.

PLTW

6th Grade

Understandings

1.An engineering notebook is used to record original ideas or designs and to document the design process related to an invention or innovation.

2.A portfolio is an organized collection of best works.

3.Science is the study of the natural world, while technology is the study of how humans develop new products to meet needs and wants.

4.Teams of people can accomplish more than one individual working alone.

5.Technological change is seen through inventions, innovations, and the evolution of technological artifacts, processes, and systems.

6.Technology can have positive and negative social, cultural, economical, political, and environmental consequences.

7.Engineers, designers, and engineering technologists are needed in high demand for the development of future technology to meet societal needs and wants.

Knowledge and Skills

It is expected that students will:

•Utilize standard procedures to use and maintain an engineering notebook.

•Use guidelines for developing and maintaining an engineering notebook to evaluate and select pieces of one’s own work for inclusion in a portfolio.

•Describe the relationship between science, technology, engineering, and math.

•Identify the differences between invention and innovation.

•Operate as an effective member of a team to complete an investigation.

•Describe engineering and explain how engineers participate in or contribute to the invention and innovation of products.

•Describe impacts that technology has had on society.

Essential Questions

1.What is the purpose of a portfolio for a student?

2.What is the purpose of a portfolio for an engineer?

3.Why is it important for engineers to document their work in their engineering notebook?

4.How are our lives impacted by engineers?

5.What is the difference between an invention and innovation?

6.How does the use of technology affect the way that you live?

Monday

Warmup. Students will use the Chrome books to research different ideas for a furniture project. They will have 4 different scenarios to choose from as a project focus.

Tuesday

Warmup. Students will use the decision matrix to come up with their favorite design idea. They will start drawing a template. Homework will be assigned.

Wednesday

Warmup. Students will be asked to draw a front, top, side, and back view of their design. Students will be asked to start the creation process of their furniture.

Thursday

Warmup. Students will be asked to continue the creation process of their furniture. Homework will be assigned.

Friday

Warmup. Students will research how finished products they could use to make their furniture in an eco friendly manner on the Chrome Books. They will report out on this.

Tracy Chappell
Grade sheets given out this week.

Lesson Plans

April 11

PLTW

6th Grade

Understandings

1. An engineering notebook is used to record original ideas or designs and to document the design process related to an invention or innovation.

2.A portfolio is an organized collection of best works.

3.Science is the study of the natural world, while technology is the study of how humans develop new products to meet needs and wants.

4.Teams of people can accomplish more than one individual working alone.

5.Technological change is seen through inventions, innovations, and the evolution of technological artifacts, processes, and systems.

6.Technology can have positive and negative social, cultural, economical, political, and environmental consequences.

7.Engineers, designers, and engineering technologists are needed in high demand for the development of future technology to meet societal needs and wants.

Knowledge and Skills

It is expected that students will:

•Utilize standard procedures to use and maintain an engineering notebook.

•Use guidelines for developing and maintaining an engineering notebook to evaluate and select pieces of one’s own work for inclusion in a portfolio.

•Describe the relationship between science, technology, engineering, and math.

•Identify the differences between invention and innovation.

•Operate as an effective member of a team to complete an investigation.

•Describe engineering and explain how engineers participate in or contribute to the invention and innovation of products.

•Describe impacts that technology has had on society.

Essential Questions

1.What is the purpose of a portfolio for a student?

2.What is the purpose of a portfolio for an engineer?

3.Why is it important for engineers to document their work in their engineering notebook?

4.How are our lives impacted by engineers?

5.What is the difference between an invention and innovation?

6.How does the use of technology affect the way that you live?

Monday

Warmup.will open Activity 1.1.2 Introduction to Engineering by asking students to define the following terms in their own words: STEM, science, technology, engineering, and math on the activity.Students will review their grade sheets. Introduction to Engineering.ppt.Teachers and students will brainstorm a list of technological products so that the student will realize the list is seemingly endless. Students should choose an invention/innovation of interest to them. The teacher will list chosen artifacts so that students know they must select a different invention or innovation.

Tuesday

Warmup. Introduction

Engineering, Technology, and Science – we use these terms every day, but what do they mean and what impact have they had on past and present lives? For example, some of you may have had an X-ray for a broken arm, or your parents may have a water purification device on your household faucet. Were the products and inventions created because of science or because of technology, by a scientist or by an engineer?

Here is your chance to find out about a product of your choice, maybe a potato chip or the sticky note, or even the color television. While you are exploring, consider asking questions about what effect the various developments have had on the evolution of civilization.

EquipmentProcedure

You and your partner will investigate a technological artifact and find out about its history and impact on civilization. You will learn how it may be used differently today. You will use various resources to find the information, including print, multi-media, and the web. Be aware that every site on the web is not always reliable, so verify your resources. You will answer the Questions to Guide You in your notebook and then prepare a presentation to share what you found with your classmates. Your teacher must approve the artifact you are researching.

Working in pairs, you and your partner will divide the work between you; be sure to regularly share your findings with your partner.

1. You will gather information about the technological development you chose by answering the Questions to Guide You. Your teacher will provide you with websites and book resources to help.

2. Prepare a 2-3 minute presentation that includes all of the required information to present to your classmates. The presentation aides could include a poster, a 2 page flyer, samples of the technological artifact that show different innovations, a prezi or a movie. Include a minimum of the information shown below.

a. Include your team member names, class, period, and selected invention.

b. Explain the original invention.

c. List the discipline(s) of engineering most important to the development of the product and explain how these disciplines were essential.

d. Provide a timeline drawn to scale showing the history ofthe invention and evolution (changes or innovations).

e. Identify major changes that have occurred in the design of the product.

f. Address the global impact on society and the environment.

Conclusion

1. Why are most products innovated?

2. Choose one product that you would like to innovate. Why did you choose this product? What change(s) would you make to it?

Homework assigned

Wednesday

Warmup. Students will continue to work on artifact project.

Thursday

Warmup. Students will present their artifact project. Homework assigned.

Friday

Warmup.Technology includes the new products and systems that are developed to solve problems. For example, engines increase the speed at which people can travel. The use of technology sometimes helps to improve our lives by allowing us to travel farther, faster. However, sometimes the consequences are negative. For instance, with increased speed there is an increase in the chance for an accident to be fatal. According to the US Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration, speeding is a factor in about one-third of all fatal crashes. So is getting places faster a positive or negative effect of technology?

Equipment

•Gateway notebook

Procedure

In this activity you will answer the following questions and complete the charts while your teacher presents What is Technology? You will discuss with your classmates different products of technology and how they have impacted you, your community, and society in general. Consequences of technology may be desirable, undesirable, expected, unexpected, and often a bit of each.

Conclusion

1. What is technology?

2. What is the difference between technology and science?

Provide three examples of each category of technology listed below. List a positive and negative impact that the invention or innovation has had on society.

Genetics and Heredity

7th Grade

L.OL.07.21: Recognize that all organisms are composed of cells (single cell organisms, multicellular organisms).

L.OL.07.22: Explain how cells make up different body tissues, organs and organ systems.

L.OL.07.23 Describe how cells in all multicellular organisms are specialized to take in nutrients, which they use to provide energy for the work that cells do and to make the materials that a cell or organism needs.

L.OL.07.24: Recognize that cells function in a similar way in all organisms.

L.OL.07.31: Describe growth and development in terms of increase of cell number and/or cell size.

L.OL.07.32: Examine how through cell division, cells can become specialized for specific functions.

Measurement Topic 7: Heredity

L.HE.07.21: Compare how characteristics of living things are passed on through generations, both asexually and sexually.

L.HE.07.22: Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of sexual vs. asexual reproduction.

Misconceptions

•Daughters inherit most of their characteristics from their mothers. Boys inherit most of their characteristics from their fathers.

•Sexual reproduction occurs in animals but not plants.

•Students do not distinguish between sexual and asexual reproduction.

•Students do not understand the relationship between DNA, genes, and chromosomes.

Asexual Reproduction

Budding

Diploid

Egg

Fertilization

Haploid

Meiosis

Regeneration

Sexual Reproduction

Specialized Cell

Sperm

Zygote

Monday

Warmup. How do you feel you are going to end the year? Do you feel rejuvenated?

As a class we will discuss the week’s agenda and their grades. Students will have an opportunity to grade their homework #3 and keep it to study. They will also get their grade sheets and tests back. If a student’s grade is high enough they will have an opportunity to complete grade corrections. If the student’s grade is lower they will be offered a retest on Wednesday. Students will have the hour to make notes off of their test. Students that are done will being their Alien Genetics Project which is due Thursday.

phillipslms.weebly.com/uploads/2/8/0/7/2807309/alien_genetics.pdf

Prepared by GCPS Science Office, 2008-2009 Content Rich Activity Alien Genetics Introduction: You will be investigating the genetics of a species of alien.

Tuesday

Warmup. Students will have an opportunity to ask questions about alien project. Students that have signed up to retest will be grouped to review with me. Students will have the rest of the hour to work on alien project. Homework: Students will be asked to complete a life history for their alien including names, jobs, interests and societal contributions. Homework assigned.

Wednesday

Warmup. Students that signed up for retest will take it (some with Ms. Hayes). Other students will complete their alien projects and hang them up in the hallway with their alien life history. Students that complete early will complete mini book verbal reviews of the genetics books.

Thursday

Warmup. Students will complete Bubble Gum Physics lab. See below. Homework assigned.

Friday

Warmup. Students will complete a unit cheat sheet in their ISJ. They will then practice in reading word problems and plugging into equations using their unit sheet. They will compete against each other to find the answers.

Bubble Gum Physics Name __________________________

Obtain a piece of bubble gum from your teacher and

start chewing to get ready for the experiments!

Part A: Chomper Challenge

(1) For this experiment, you will conduct five trials to determine the number of chomps you can do in

30 seconds. A chomp is defined as a “big chew”, or the kind that usually causes you to get caught with

gum!

(2) Use a timer to determine the number of chomps you can do in 30 seconds. Record your data in

the chart. Repeat the same process for the other trials.

(3) What is your average speed? Round answers to the hundredth. ________ chomps/second

(4) Based on your average chomping speed, how many chomps could you do in five minutes, one

hour, or one day? Show your work!

5 min = _______ chomps 1 hour = _______ chomps 1 day = _______ chomps

Part B: Speedy Chompers

(1) Use a timer to determine the number of chomps you can do in 1

minute. As the time reaches each point, record the number of chomps

you have completed. Do not stop the timer as you record your data.

You may want to practice a few times before running an “official” trial.

T. Trimpe 2001

Time Chomps

20 sec

40 sec

60 sec

Trial Chomps Time Speed

1

2

3

4

5

Speed = # of Chomps ÷ Time

Round speeds to the nearest hundredth!

(2) Calculate your chomping speed at each point (20 sec, 40 sec, and 60 sec) using the data from

your experiment. Show your work! Round all answers to the nearest hundredth!

Speed at T = 20 sec = _______ chomps ÷ 20 sec = _________ chomps/sec

Speed at T = 40 sec = _______ chomps ÷ 40 sec = _________ chomps/sec

Speed at T = 60 sec = _______ chomps ÷ 60 sec = _________ chomps/sec

(3) Did you maintain a constant rate? Explain.

Think About It!

Write a paragraph to summarize the results of your experiments.

Are your results accurate and reliable? Why or why not?

What other experiments could you do with bubble gum?

T. Trimpe 2001

March 21 and 28 Lesson plans

Tracy Chappell
Lesson Plans
March 21st
March 28th

Unit 4
6th Grade
Objectives:

E.SE.06.51: Explain plate tectonic movement, and that the lithospheric plates move centimeters each year.
E.SE.06.52: Demonstrate how major geological events (earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and mountain building) result from these plate motions.

E.SE.06.61: Describe the earth as a magnet and compare and contrast the magnetic properties of the earth to that of a natural or manufactured magnet.

E.ST.06.41: Explain how earth processes (erosion, mountain building and glacier movement) are used for the measurement of geologic time through observing rock layers.
E.SE.06.62: Explain how a compass works using the magnetic field of the earth, and how a compass is used for navigation on land and sea.

E.ST.06.31: Explain how rocks and fossils are used to understand the age and geological history of the earth (timelines, relative dating, and rock layers).

E.ST.06.42: Describe how fossils provide important evidence of how life and environmental conditions have changed.

S.IP.06.13: Use tools and equipment (spring scales, stop watches, meter sticks, tapes, models, hand lens, thermometer, models, sieves, and microscopes) appropriate to scientific investigations.

E.SE.06.53: Describe layers of the earth as lithosphere (crust and upper mantle),
convecting mantle, and a dense core.

S.IP.06.11: Generate scientific questions based on observations, investigations, and research.

Where do most earthquakes occur on Earth?
How do earthquakes occur?
What are plate tectonics?

What are the layers of the earth, and how do they affect the movement of the lithospheric plates?

How does the movement of tectonic plates cause earthquakes, mountains, and volcanoes?

How does the movement of the earth’s tectonic plates cause changes in the surface of the earth?
What makes a magnet attract some materials and not others?
What is a magnetic field?
What makes the earth behave as a magnet?
How do rock layers and fossils provide evidence about the nature of ancient life and the history of the earth?
How do fossils give evidence of continental movement millions of years ago?
How are fossils formed?
How do rocks, fossils, rock layers, and earth’s processes help to determine the age and geological history of the earth?

Monday

Warmup, Students will review their Earth test as a class. Students will be able to make test corrections to improve their overall grade. When students finish with test corrections they will create flashcards over the key points we covered this year. Then as a class we will play African American Jengo. This was planned for February, but was bumped due to snow days.

Tuesday
Warmup, Sub day. Students will have a review sheets over tools, averaging, and graphing.
Wednesday

Warmup. Students will review the year’s standards playing a version of review jeopardy. Students will play a version of African American Jingo.
Thursday

Warmup. Homework #3 assigned, due next Tuesday. Students will take their Common Growth Assessment.

Friday

Warmup. Students will have time to complete their CGA. If they are done they will take the PLTW pre engineering survey and begin to set up their engineering notebook.

Understandings

1. An engineering notebook is used to record original ideas or designs and to document the design process related to an invention or innovation.
2.A portfolio is an organized collection of best works.
3.Science is the study of the natural world, while technology is the study of how humans develop new products to meet needs and wants.
4.Teams of people can accomplish more than one individual working alone.

5.Technological change is seen through inventions, innovations, and the evolution of technological artifacts, processes, and systems.

6.Technology can have positive and negative social, cultural, economical, political, and environmental consequences.

7.Engineers, designers, and engineering technologists are needed in high demand for the development of future technology to meet societal needs and wants.

Knowledge and Skills
It is expected that students will:
•Utilize standard procedures to use and maintain an engineering notebook.
•Use guidelines for developing and maintaining an engineering notebook to evaluate and select pieces of one’s own work for inclusion in a portfolio.
•Describe the relationship between science, technology, engineering, and math.

•Identify the differences between invention and innovation.
•Operate as an effective member of a team to complete an investigation.
•Describe engineering and explain how engineers participate in or contribute to the invention and innovation of products.
•Describe impacts that technology has had on society.
Essential Questions
1.What is the purpose of a portfolio for a student?

2.What is the purpose of a portfolio for an engineer?
3.Why is it important for engineers to document their work in their engineering notebook?
4.How are our lives impacted by engineers?
5.What is the difference between an invention and innovation?
6.How does the use of technology affect the way that you live?
Monday
Warmup. Students will complete setting up their engineering notebooks. They will practice working in groups completing the puzzle exercise.

Tuesday
Warmup.Students will work in the dry lab trying to engineer the fastest balloon rocket. Homework #4 will be assigned and due on Thursday.

Wednesday

Warmup. Sub day. Students will complete graphing practice sheets.

Thursday

Warmup.The teacher will show the DVD Engineers Can Do Anything! (20 minutes)

The teacher will lead a discussion of the essential elements of the presentation and DVD.

Students will complete the conclusion questions for Activity 1.1.2 Introduction to Engineering and put in notebook for future use.

Students will use appropriate engineering notebook template for daily entries.

Homework #5 will be assigned and due on Tuesday after Spring Break. It will include an extra credit option.

Genetics and Heredity
7th Grade

L.OL.07.21: Recognize that all organisms are composed of cells (single cell organisms, multicellular organisms).
L.OL.07.22: Explain how cells make up different body tissues, organs and organ systems.
L.OL.07.23 Describe how cells in all multicellular organisms are specialized to take in nutrients, which they use to provide energy for the work that cells do and to make the materials that a cell or organism needs.
L.OL.07.24: Recognize that cells function in a similar way in all organisms.
L.OL.07.31: Describe growth and development in terms of increase of cell number and/or cell size.
L.OL.07.32: Examine how through cell division, cells can become specialized for specific functions.
Measurement Topic 7: Heredity

L.HE.07.21: Compare how characteristics of living things are passed on through generations, both asexually and sexually.

L.HE.07.22: Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of sexual vs. asexual reproduction.

Misconceptions
•Daughters inherit most of their characteristics from their mothers. Boys inherit most of their characteristics from their fathers.

•Sexual reproduction occurs in animals but not plants.

•Students do not distinguish between sexual and asexual reproduction.
•Students do not understand the relationship between DNA, genes, and chromosomes.

Asexual Reproduction

budding
Diploid

Egg
Fertilization
Haploid
Meiosis
Regeneration
Sexual Reproduction

specialized Cell
Sperm
Zygote

Monday

Warmup. Students will take notes over asexual vs sexual reproduction. They will compare and contrast. They will then write an essay over what would happen if humans became asexual organisms.

Tuesday

Warmup. Sub day. Students will have a review sheets over tools, averaging, and graphing.

Wednesday

Warmup. Students will review asexual vs sexual reproduction. They will then use a card sort to practice. Students will then write notes on reproduction. Students will be introduced to the terms, genes, alleles, homozygous, heterozygous and Punnet square. A video will be shown that highlights these terms.

Thursday

Warmup. Students will complete a reading review worksheet over Mendel’s contributions and the basic principles of heredity. Students will review their answers as a class.Homework #3 assigned and is due Tuesday.
Friday

Warmup. Students will take notes over the basics of genetics. They will then practice Punnett squares to determine characteristics.

Monday

Warmup. Students write review notes from power point. They will then practice their Punnet squares and determine different characteristics.

Tuesday

Warmup. Students will complete a tulip lab in which they will dissect a tulip identifying parts with a focus on a plants asexual and sexual reproductive strategies. Students will write a type 2 over their findings. Homework #4 will be assigned and due on Thursday.

Wednesday

Warmup. Sub day. Students will complete a written assessment over genetics and heredity. They will have a graphing review packet if they finish early.

Thursday

Warmup. Students will begin a genetics activity in which they will create a genetics baby based on flipping for characteristiccs. Homework #5 will be assigned and due on Tuesday after Spring Break. It will include an extra credit option.

March 14th Lesson Plans

Tracy Chappell
Lesson Plans
March 14th

Unit 4
6th Grade
Objectives:
E.SE.06.51: Explain plate tectonic movement, and that the lithospheric plates move centimeters each year.

E.SE.06.52: Demonstrate how major geological events (earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and mountain building) result from these plate motions.

E.SE.06.61: Describe the earth as a magnet and compare and contrast the magnetic properties of the earth to that of a natural or manufactured magnet.

E.ST.06.41: Explain how earth processes (erosion, mountain building and glacier movement) are used for the measurement of geologic time through observing rock layers.
E.SE.06.62: Explain how a compass works using the magnetic field of the earth, and how a compass is used for navigation on land and sea.

E.ST.06.31: Explain how rocks and fossils are used to understand the age and geological history of the earth (timelines, relative dating, and rock layers).

E.ST.06.42: Describe how fossils provide important evidence of how life and environmental conditions have changed.

S.IP.06.13: Use tools and equipment (spring scales, stop watches, meter sticks, tapes, models, hand lens, thermometer, models, sieves, and microscopes) appropriate to scientific investigations.

E.SE.06.53: Describe layers of the earth as lithosphere (crust and upper mantle),
convecting mantle, and a dense core.

S.IP.06.11: Generate scientific questions based on observations, investigations, and research.

Where do most earthquakes occur on Earth?
How do earthquakes occur?
What are plate tectonics?
What are the layers of the earth, and how do they affect the movement of the lithospheric plates?
How does the movement of tectonic plates cause earthquakes, mountains, and volcanoes?

How does the movement of the earth’s tectonic plates cause changes in the surface of the earth?

What makes a magnet attract some materials and not others?

What is a magnetic field?

What makes the earth behave as a magnet?

How do rock layers and fossils provide evidence about the nature of ancient life and the history of the earth?

How do fossils give evidence of continental movement millions of years ago?

How are fossils formed?

How do rocks, fossils, rock layers, and earth’s processes help to determine the age and geological history of the earth?

Monday
Warmup, Students will complete notes on boundaries and review as a class. They will then be given pictures of different Earth landscapes. They will work with a partner to decide what kind of landform they are and what is the Earth action taking place. For example, Hawaii is evidence of volcanoes adding new crust to the tectonic plate. As a class we will review answers. If students finish early they will read about landforms or complete tectonic drawings.
Tuesday
Warmup, Students will read in Earth book about Alfred Wegener and the theory of plate tectonics. They will take Lancer notes in their ISJ highlighting the evidence of the theory. Students will watch animations of Pangaea forming and then breaking apart. They will then predict how the new “Pangaea” would look. What continents will be neighbors and what landforms exist from studying a current tectonic plate. Students will listen to the Plate tectonic rap.Homework #1 assigned, due Thursday.
Wednesday
Warmup. Students will watch a short video on the evidence that is used to support plate tectonics. Students will then play in groups a game of Jeopardy to review for the exam. Students will receive a participation grade for participating. Students will write 24 key terms that will be on the written assessment onto a bingo card.
Thursday

Warmup. Students will play Bingo with their assessment key terms. This will be for about 15 minutes and then students will take a written assessment over Earth’s activity. Students that finish early will have a chance to start on Friday’s work. Homework #2 assigned, due next Tuesday.
Friday
Warmup. Students will research historic earthquakes and volcanoes. They will use latitude and longitude to graph the locations. They will then compare their locations to plate tectonic locations. Students will write a Type 2 paragraph using key words: plate tectonics, earthquakes, transform fault, volcanoes and boundaries.

Genetics and Heredity
7th Grade

L.OL.07.21: Recognize that all organisms are composed of cells (single cell organisms, multicellular organisms).

L.OL.07.22: Explain how cells make up different body tissues, organs and organ systems.

L.OL.07.23 Describe how cells in all multicellular organisms are specialized to take in nutrients, which they use to provide energy for the work that cells do and to make the materials that a cell or organism needs.

L.OL.07.24: Recognize that cells function in a similar way in all organisms.

L.OL.07.31: Describe growth and development in terms of increase of cell number and/or cell size.

L.OL.07.32: Examine how through cell division, cells can become specialized for specific functions.

Measurement Topic 7: Heredity

L.HE.07.21: Compare how characteristics of living things are passed on through generations, both asexually and sexually.

L.HE.07.22: Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of sexual vs. asexual reproduction.

Misconceptions
Daughters inherit most of their characteristics from their mothers. Boys inherit most of their characteristics from their fathers.
Sexual reproduction occurs in animals but not plants.
Students do not distinguish between sexual and asexual reproduction.
Students do not understand the relationship between DNA, genes, and chromosomes.

Asexual Reproduction
Budding
Diploid
Egg
Fertilization
Haploid
Meiosis
Regeneration
Sexual Reproduction
Specialized Cell
Sperm
Zygote

Monday
Warmup. Students will clean out their engineering journals and write a letter to themselves to be opened in eighth grade. Students will then create a genetics unit page in their ISJ’s for their new unit. On it they will include the words phenotype and genotype. Students will have the option of writing their traits or drawing themselves.
Tuesday
Warmup. Students will take a pretest over Reproduction and heredity. STudents will then have a list of nouns. They will be asked to identify them as matter, living, non living, non matter, made of cells. They will then write a Type 2 over the patterns they found. Homework #1 assigned and is due Thursday.
Wednesday
Warmup. Students will make 8 vocabulary cards over key terms including asexual reproduction, sexual reproduction, organism, regeneration, fission, sex cells, budding. Students will write the definition of the word and then have a choice of the following: draw a picture, give 5 examples, pick a different book’s definition, write an original scientific sentence. This will be written in their ISJ’s.
Thursday
Warmup. Students will review the makeup of a cell and basic organelles with the levels of hierarchy. Students will be given different examples of cells in different living things and look for similarities and differences.They will graph the common elements in humans and compare to other organisms.
Homework #2 assigned and is due Tuesday.
Friday
Warmup. Students will read about stem cells and write Lancer notes on their unique function. Then students will discuss how cells differentiate and grow to make different organisms. They will have library books to explore some of the different organisms that are more unique on the planet. They will be asked to share their favorite with the class.